02
FEB
2013

February 2013 Transit Times for the Great Red Spot on Jupiter

The Great Red Spot (GRS) is a massive storm system that churns its way through Jupiter’s atmosphere. It is a very long-lived storm system. Scientists think it has been in existence for more than 300 years, and still shows no signs of decaying. You’ll need a telescope of at
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15
DEC
2012

Stunning Jupiter in the Evening Sky

Jupiter is looking awesome at the moment in the evening sky. It shines brightly at magnitude -2.4 in the constellation of Taurus the Bull in late November, making a nice pattern in the sky with the Hyades open cluster and Pleiades (M45) a little up to the right. There has been some go
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29
NOV
2012

Ganymede Moon Transit across Jupiter – 28 November 2012

On the night of November 28th the Galilean moon of Ganymede made a transit pass across the face of Jupiter. Galilean moon transits are not uncommon. There are several opportunities to see the phenomenon each month that Jupiter is in the sky. But on November 28th the transit took place
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23
OCT
2012

Jupiter and the Great Pale Spot

One of Jupiter’s most enduring features is its Great Red Spot (GRS) – a massive rotating storm in the planet’s upper atmosphere that carves its way across the disc every few hours. The storm system is larger than the Earth – in fact you could fit two Earth size
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07
SEP
2012

Jupiter at 5am on 7 September 2012

Jupiter looked awesome this morning through the 12″ Orion Optics telescope. Plugged in a 12.4mm eyepiece and 2x barlow to give me a magnification of x192. Used a neodymium filter to boost contrast in the planet’s cloud details. The Great Red Spot (GRS) was just turning ont
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10
AUG
2012

See Amazing Detail on Jupiter in the Morning Sky this Summer

Jupiter is an amazing sight in almost any sized telescope. Even with a 150mm (6″) telescope  it is easy to make out Jupiter’s main cloud belts, the Great Red Spot and other features like festoons, dark barges and giant swirls. With larger telescopes using moderate to high
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